Personal Stories

Get advice and perspective from families who have also been impacted by substance use or addiction.

On a Thursday morning in October, Sandy Snodgrass was given the news that no parent should ever have to hear. Her son, Robert Bruce Snodgrass, was found dead. He had died from a fentanyl overdose.
What happens when some deaths are considered more socially acceptable than others?
Thanksgiving, Christmas, birthdays or anything that was special to our family — our son who was using drugs found a way to bring heartache to the occasion. Here are my tips for dealing with it.
I am working on my own recovery, so I am properly able to support his.
“Tell them my story.” My 20-year-old daughter Casey said these words to me not long before she died of an accidental heroin overdose on January 15, 2017.
For this father, it took time to learn that relapse can be a natural part of addiction recovery.
When my son became addicted, I embarked on a journey to learn about preventing and treating this disease. I wish I knew then what I know now.
All of us — men and women alike, who contend with family members, especially children, suffering from substance use disorder, are haunted by loss.
These were men that drank and played hard during a time when there was less discrimination over a swing and a swig. Men whose substance use were denied or protected, sometimes even by the sportswriters who sat at the bar with them.