Addiction Is a Brain Disease

It’s human nature to want to compare yourself to others.

You may think: I drink alcohol and I know my limits. Alcoholics just don’t know how to control themselves. It’s their choice that they don’t want to stop drinking. Just as easily, you probably infer the same thought process for other drugs out there: heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, etc. You think: drug use is a choice.

Yes, drug use is a choice. It’s free-will to pick up that joint, light it and smoke it. But what’s going on behind the scenes (i.e. in your brain) isn’t a choice. It’s not possible to control your brain structure.

I’ve often asked myself: Why is there such resistance to acknowledge addiction as a disease? The media is so quick to call the person with an addiction irresponsible, reckless, selfish and troubled. And the majority of online commenters fuel the fire by honing in on the behaviors of the disease, rather than acknowledging the disease itself. It makes me wonder: Do people understand what addiction really is?

Maybe, maybe not. My inclination is sensationalized news sells more magazines and drives traffic.  That’s why news sources play up what’s going on with the Charlie Sheens and Lindsay Lohans of the world, but why do so many of the rest of us? It’s easy to blame someone for the choices they make in life, but when it comes to drug addiction, there is little choice involved. Although everyone has the potential for addiction, some people are much more predisposed to addiction than others.

When a person is addicted, they’re suffering continuously. Their brain chemistry changes causing distortions of cognitive and emotional functioning, and, even in the face of death, they continue to harm themselves. Family and friends of people who are addicted to drugs claim erratic changes in mood, behavior and perception. Many say their addicted loved one becomes an entirely different person.

Just like schizophrenics can’t control their hallucinations, Parkinson’s patients can’t control their trembling, clinically-depressed patients can’t control their moods — once a person is addicted to drugs, it’s not that different than other brain diseases. No matter how someone has developed an illness, once the person has it, they’re in a diseased state and need treatment.

Moreover, like any other illness, it affects family and friends, too. There are moms who stay up all night waiting for their child to come home. There are dads who fear that dreaded phone call telling them that their child has overdosed and passed away. There are siblings who try to remain strong as their family is slowly falling apart. There are friends who feel like their hands are tied, but are clinging to that small ounce of hope that the friend they once knew will accept help.

Ask the parents, family and friends of a person addicted to drugs if drug addiction is a choice. Go ahead and ask the person addicted, as well. They will tell you from their experiences that addiction is not a choice.

Knowledge truly is power. When we criticize and judge something that we don’t really understand, and we do it in the numbers, it sways public opinion – intended or not. With this mindset, the stigma that is attached with the disease of addiction will never go away unless we all change how we view it.

18 Responses

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    Jarell

    March 15, 2012 at 4:29 AM

    I used alcohol and several types of drugs for over 28 years. I was addicted to these substances. Now, that being said, I do remember the first time I smoked a cigarette a joint, hash, shot up and so on. I made a choice to do these things, I remember deciding that I wanted to do this. Now after I had lived doing these things for a number of years it became something I could not quit doing and to be honest I did not want to quit. There were several times through the years that someone would talk me into quiting, even though I realy did’nt want to. I remember the minute this person was no longer around to baby set me, I would go right back to the substances. It was’nt till I wanted to quit that I did. It was never a disease to me, it was a choice.

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    danielvitory

    August 26, 2011 at 2:14 PM

    ohhhhhh
    I have felt shame about having a child who is an addict. It’s one of the toughest emotions I’ve had to deal with. The ignorance of others; neighbors, friends, family, etc., is frustrating and can make you feel bad about yourself. I’ve found that reading this blog and going to Alanon meetings has been a big helpHelp For Troubled Teens
    Troubled Teen Help
    Troubled Teens

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    danielvitory

    August 26, 2011 at 2:13 PM

    ohhhhhh
    I have felt shame about having a child who is an addict. It’s one of the toughest emotions I’ve had to deal with. The ignorance of others; neighbors, friends, family, etc., is frustrating and can make you feel bad about yourself. I’ve found that reading this blog and going to Alanon meetings has been a big help

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