Too Few People Who Survive Opioid Overdose Get Medication-Assisted Treatment

teen girl talking to counselor

A new study concludes too few people who survive an opioid overdose receive medication-assisted treatment that will reduce the chance of another overdose.

The study included more than 17,500 adults who survived an opioid overdose and found only about one-third received either buprenorphine (Suboxone), methadone or naltrexone (Vivitrol), HealthDay reports.

Among people who did receive one of these medications, most did not stay on the drug for a long time, the researchers report in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers found 17 percent used buprenorphine, with a median use of four months; 11 percent used methadone, with a median use of five months; and 6 percent used naltrexone, with a median use of one month.

Despite not using these drugs for long periods, methadone reduced the chance of dying by 59 percent, while buprenorphine reduced the risk by 38 percent.

Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction

Medication-assisted treatment can help your child overcome his or her opioid addiction. Learn more about what it is, how it works and if it could work for your family.

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