As Marijuana Use Increases, So Does Addiction, Report

According to the Oregonian, a new study published in JAMA Psychiatry, has found that marijuana use has more than doubled since 2001, with nearly 10 percent of adults across the country reporting marijuana use in 2013.

The percentage of people reporting dependence or abuse of marijuana also doubled, from 1.5 percent in 2001 to nearly 3 percent in 2013. Among marijuana users, the report found that 3 out of every 10 people, or nearly 7 million Americans, have a marijuana abuse or addiction problem.

The biggest increases in marijuana abuse and dependence was found among middle aged or older adults, women, African-Americans, Hispanics and people living in the southern U.S.

“While many in the United States think prohibition of recreational marijuana should be ended, this study and others suggest caution and the need for public education about the potential harms in marijuana use, including the risk for addiction,” the report stated.

The new report also noted that many people who use marijuana do not become addicted, but with a 30 percent chance of abuse or dependence, the number of people struggling from addiction to marijuana is likely to keep increasing as the number of marijuana users also increases, the report said.

Marijuana
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    Jame Matter

    November 10, 2015 at 12:59 PM

    Of course, we could legalize recreational cannabis with a tax structure that supports treatment. Tax the recreational pot at a level that will support free treatment on demand for anyone reporting a pot use problem (PUP). I’m not saying, “problem solved,” but prohibition hasn’t worked very well, and just legalizing it will likely increase the number of addicts. So compensate.

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    Jerry Epstsein

    October 22, 2015 at 6:39 PM

    I should also add that NIAAA’s own report referenced – NESARC 2001-2

    showed heavy comorbidity with AUD — the vast majority of marijuana users never have a problem unless they have a problem with alcohol

    http://www.dpft.org/duianotes.htm#2a

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    Jerry Epstsein

    October 22, 2015 at 6:30 PM

    consider this from the NIAAA hatchet job (Grant et al.) that was devoid of balance

    “The new report also noted that many people who use marijuana do not become addicted, but with a 30 percent chance of abuse or dependence, the number of people struggling from addiction to marijuana is likely to keep increasing as the number of marijuana users also increases, the report said.”

    #1 – 30 percent is ALCOHOL not marijuana … of about 22 million cases of SUD each year about 80 percent have alcohol problems (AUD) … NSDUH 2002-2014

    #2 they ignored all the best government evidence that more “use” does NOT mean more “struggling from addiction to marijuana”

    NSDUH 2002 -2014 shows that during those years:
    there were about 30 million new users of marijuana

    monthly use increased from less than 15 million in 2002 to about 22 million in 2014

    how many net new cases of problem use of marijuana (SUD) … ZERO

    just over 4 million in 2002 and 2014 a slight percentage DECREASE

    http://www.dpft.org/resources/NSDUHresults2013.pdf
    archive there gives quick access to NSDUH 2004 – 2013

    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-FRR1-2014/NSDUH-FRR1-2014.pdf

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    Jose

    October 22, 2015 at 6:26 PM

    Someone like a big Drug and Alcohol organization should compile all the science based negative effects of Marijuana use both physical, mental, addictive, occupational and social that can occur to someone who smokes Marijuana. Like this information stated here, we know that there is a 10% chance of becoming addicted to Marijuana if you smoke it so there must be a 20% chance of Marijuana abuse to get to the 30% rate that is mentioned here. It would be nice to have a manual that has all this in one place along with references to the actual research study. I am always careful to tell people that most will not develop a Marijuana Use Disorder, new DSM-5 diagnosis, but that some will.

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    Rosalind Griffin

    October 22, 2015 at 12:52 PM

    This finding is not surprising given the fact that marijuana affects the brain’s neurotransmitters.In addition, the we add the accompanying factors that influence drug use such as set, setting, the nature and strength of the substance and the purpose of use. Some predisposed individual is likely to become addicted. Hence, legal status of marijuana will not make users immune to possible dependence. Users need to be aware of this possibility as a cautionary possibility.

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