Denver Police to Parents: Make Sure Halloween Candy Doesn’t Contain Marijuana

The Denver Police Department has posted a public service video, made in conjunction with a marijuana store owner, that advises parents to check their children’s Halloween candy to make sure it isn’t infused with marijuana.

Marijuana edible products can mimic candy such as Sour Patch Kids, Jolly Ranchers and gummy bears, the video cautions parents. Patrick Johnson, the owner of Urban Dispensary, says, “There’s really no way to tell the difference. It’s best just to toss that stuff into the trash.”

There have been no reported cases of marijuana-infused treats being given to children on Halloween in Denver, The New York Times reports. Marijuana advocates say the warnings perpetuate urban legends, such as candy bars spiked with razor blades. But the warning underscores the concern of parents’ groups and regulators that marijuana edible products look too much like regular food, the article notes.

Edible marijuana products have become a popular alternative to smoking marijuana in Colorado this year, since retail sales of the products became legal on January 1. Adults 21 and over can legally purchase marijuana edibles at state-licensed stores. Marijuana is now available in products ranging from candy to soda and granola.

Recently, marijuana retailers in Colorado have begun responding to reports of tourists who have had bad experiences after consuming large amounts of THC by offering products with lower amounts. THC is the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. A “serving” of marijuana is 10 milligrams of THC under Colorado rules. It can be difficult to tell exactly how much THC is in an individual cookie or brownie. Many marijuana edibles contain 100 milligrams of THC, and are meant to be broken into multiple pieces to avoid overdosing.

Earlier this year, health officials reported legal marijuana edible products were linked to two deaths and an increase in emergency room visits in Colorado.

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