College Students More Likely to Misuse Adderall, Study Finds

    College students between the ages of 18 and 22 were twice as likely to use the amphetamine drug Adderall nonmedically as those who had not been in college at all or were only part-time students, according to data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH).

    Approximately 90 percent of the full-time college students who had used Adderall nonmedically in the past year also engaged in binge drinking in the past month, and more than 50 percent were heavy alcohol users, researchers reported. Students under the legal drinking age who used Adderall were also more likely to binge drink or engage in heavy drinking than underage nonstudents who had not used Adderall nonmedically.

    Full-time college students who had used Adderall nonmedically in the past year were almost three times more likely to use marijuana, eight times more likely to use cocaine, eight times more likely to use tranquilizers nonmedically, and five times more likely to use pain relievers nonmedically, the survey found.

    Prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and for narcolepsy, Adderall is classified as a Schedule II drug because of its high potential for abuse and dependence. However, it has become popular on college campuses as a study aid.

    By Partnership Staff
    April 2009

    Published

    April 2009